Above Ground Storage Tank or AST

Above Ground Storage Tank or AST Common Questions

 

Above Ground Storage Tank or AST, like an Underground Storage Tank (UST), contain heating oil for the purpose of heating homes and buildings. There are specific differences between the two tanks and these are some of the most common questions we are asked regarding ASTs.

What is an above ground storage tank or AST?

Homes, apartments, farms and some businesses that are currently or were heated using diesel heating oil, used an above ground storage tank (AST) to store the heating oil. ASTs are most commonly mounted on a stand or a ground pad either outside or in a basement. ASTs can also be partially buried in the ground, usually in a basement or crawlspace.

Since it isn’t underground, do I really need to be worried about an AST?

Yes, even above ground tanks can leak, resulting in contamination of soil and drinking water supplies. Any oil spill can pose a serious threat to human health and the environment, regardless of where the tank is located.

What is the difference between an AST and a UST?

The distinct difference between the two tanks is this:

  • If the tank and its piping is located 10% BELOW ground surface it is considered a UST, anything ABOVE 10% ground surface is considered an AST.
  • Another exception is that, ASTs are not regulated by the DEQ, therefore not governed the same way as a UST.

For example, if a UST is leaking above 50 PPM (parts per million) the contractor is required to report this to the DEQ and is subject to remediation, based on the level of contamination. After the clean-up has been completed, the UST is then decommissioned and registered with the DEQ. This scenario can also be compared for an out of service underground storage tank, once the tank has been decommissioned it can then be registered with the DEQ.

The circumstances for an AST are different. When an AST is or has leaked, is no longer in-service, or the homeowner is switching to a new heat source, the tank can simply be removed, no decommissioning or registration with the DEQ is required. However, like decommissioning an underground storage tank, each AST removal can bring about a different set of considerations.

What to do with an Above Ground Storage Tank AST when decommissioning is not an option

If you don’t decommission and register the AST with the DEQ, what do you do?

First, we would need to determine where is the tank located?

  • Outside the home
Above Ground Storage Tank or AST

Above Ground Storage Tank or AST – Exterior AST secured to concrete pad foundation.

  • In a basement or crawlspace, with a separate exterior access
Above Ground Storage Tank or AST

Above Ground Storage Tank or AST – AST located in basement with exterior access.

  • In a basement or crawlspace, with access through the home only
Above Ground Storage Tank or AST

Above Ground Storage Tank or AST – AST located within a crawlspace, no exterior access. For this AST to be removed, it will need to be cut into pieces.

Regardless of where the above ground storage tank or AST is located on your property, it is very important to have it removed by a licensed contractor with pollution insurance. If the AST is removed by a general contractor, and they usually DO NOT have pollution insurance, and heating oil is spilled in the house or the yard, the homeowner will be left with the clean-up, not the contractor.

Once the location has been determined:

  • All heating oil and sludge are pumped out, the tank removed and disposed of via recycling.
  • Depending if the tank is on the exterior or interior of the home determines if the tank can be removed as one piece or if it will need to be cut into portions and carried out of the home.
  • If applicable, the fill and vent are removed and holes would be patched.
    • Removing or concreting over the fill eliminates the possibility of an accidental fuel re-fill.
Above Ground Storage Tank or AST

Above Ground Storage Tank or AST – AST Vent (the larger pipe) and fill pipe.

When an Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Leaks

What would cause an AST leak?

There are numerous reasons an AST can leak; improperly secured tanks, tank corrosion, equipment or support failure, overfilling the tank, or it could be as simple as human error.

Above Ground Storage Tank or AST

Above Ground Storage Tank or AST – Tank that has fallen down, if the contents are not pumped out, diesel fuel would be leaked into the yard.

My AST is leaking, what should I do?

  • Place a bucket underneath the tank to catch the release
    • If the AST is within the home, block all floor drains to prevent discharge into a drywell or sewer
  • Call a qualified heating oil tank provider that can respond to and clean-up a leaking tank
    • The AST would be pumped of all residual liquids
    • Clean-up would be performed to remove any heating oil contamination
Above Ground Storage Tank or AST

Above Ground Storage Tank or AST – Leaking AST, small bowl has been placed underneath the leak to catch the heating oil.

PLIA in Washington State

PLIA Insurance Coverage

In 1995 the Washington Legislature added pollution liability coverage for heating oil tanks to PLIAs responsibilities. PLIA in Washington State assists owners of underground storage tanks to provide available and affordable insurance through a state administered reinsurance program. The program was created in response to the rising number of heating oil tank releases and the significant impact contamination had on property values, as well as the environment. When a clean-up has been completed, PLIA will provide homeowners with a Letter of Finding which states that the site has met the clean-up standards defined in the Model Toxics Control Act.

PLIA can also assist homeowners with the following information:

  • Verifying the validity of required declarations of financial responsibility
  • Provide advice and technical assistance regarding liability and clean-up requirements

What is covered when insured through PLIA?

  • Up to $60,000 to clean-up contamination, not covered by other insurance, on your property and/or a neighboring property
  • The contamination must come from a leak that starts after a heating oil tank is registered with PLIA. The tank may be a UST or an AST
  • The tank must be registered in the current owners name
  • Reimbursement up to $1500 to repair damages on neighboring property (third party coverage) such as landscaping, flooring, painting, etc.

What is NOT covered through PLIA?

  • Leaks from abandoned or previously decommissioned tanks
  • Leaks that start before registering with PLIA
  • Property restoration on your property (first party coverage)
  • Removal/repair/replacement of the tank/lines/furnace
  • Emergency heat restoration
  • Heating oil lost in the release

How do you apply for insurance through PLIA?

  • No cost to register
  • Must complete and submit to PLIA the PLIA registration form
  • You must be registered with PLIA prior to the start of any accidental release in order for the clean-up to be covered
  • When PLIA receives the completed registration form, you will be mailed a confirmation. If confirmation is not received within 14 days, contact PLIA at 1-800-822-3905 or 360-407-0520

How to file a claim through PLIA

  • If a release is suspected or confirmed from your registered heating oil tank, PLIA must be contacted at 1-800-822-3905 or 360-407-0520 within 30 calendar days from the date the tank is disconnected from the furnace.
  • PLIA will investigate the claim, which may include taking photos of your property and the failed tank
  • Owner will hire an approved contractor to do the clean-up
  • All work must be approved by PLIA before the work starts

Who is the Policy through?

  • The Pollution Liability Insurance is covered through The Colony Insurance Company, please click the link to read about the WA Pollution Liability Policy

PLIA Insurance Coverage and Soil Sampling

How to get started, obtaining soil samples through a site assessment

  • The heating oil tank owner must select a service provider to perform the site assessment and is responsible for payment of all costs associated with soil sampling.
  • PLIA will interpret and provide a report to the owner with the results of the soil testing. Each report will provide the following information:
    • No apparent contamination that poses a threat to human health and the environment, no further action is required.
    • Minor contamination is present at the site and further site assessment or clean-up may be required.
    • Serious contamination is present, appears to pose a threat to human health and the environment, immediate corrective action is required.

What are the costs associated with the insurance through PLIA?

  • PLIA in Washington State insurance coverage is required to collect from the tank owner, requesting technical assistance, the costs incurred in providing assistance.
  • Costs incurred may include travel costs and expenses associated with monitoring site assessments, review of reports and analyses and preparation of written opinions and conclusions.
  • The Technical Assistance cost is $350.00 and must be paid in full prior to PLIA issuing its report of review and assessment of data.

Additional PLIA informational websites:

Heating Oil Technical Assistance Program (HOTAP) through PLIA Insurance Coverage

If a tank owner DOES NOT have insurance through PLIA, and it is determined that their tank is leaking, is there anything that PLIA can assist with?

Yes, even if the leaking tank is not covered by the Heating Oil Insurance Program through PLIA, a homeowner can request assistance on tank removal and environmental clean-up under the Heating Oil Technical Assistance Program (HOTAP).

How can HOTAP help my uninsured leaking UST?

Through HOTAP, PLIA can provide advice and technical assistance to owners of active or abandoned heating oil tanks if contamination resulting from a release is suspect. Advice and assistance may include:

  • Review of clean-up plans and reports
  • Interpretation of results from soil sampling through a site assessment or site check
  • An opinion letter from PLIA to the owner regarding the results of the testing

How does HOTAP work?

  • The owner of the UST will perform soil sampling, through a site check or site assessment. The owner of the tank may chose a service provider of their choice to perform any and all site work at the property. The tank owner is responsible for payment of all costs associated with soil sampling, site assessment and remediation.
  • Once sampling has been completed, the results of all testing must be forwarded to PLIA for review and evaluation. A copy of the service provider’s field notes must also be forwarded to PLIA.
  • If testing and remediation has been completed prior to PLIAs review, PLIA will consider providing a review and evaluation of the data. PLIA considers how recently the testing and remediation was completed and will consider the methods of the assessment prior to agreeing to review and evaluate the results.
  • Upon completion of review and evaluation, PLIA will provide an opinion letter informing the owner of the review and assessment of the data. The opinion letter from PLIA will provide the following opinions:
    • Property Further Action Opinion Letter– further remedial action is necessary at the property to clean-up contamination and remediation action is also necessary elsewhere at the site
    • Property No Further Action Opinion Letter – no further remedial action is necessary at the property to clean-up contamination at the site and that further remedial action is still necessary elsewhere at the site
    • Site Further Action Opinion Letter – further remedial action is necessary to clean-up contamination at the site
    • Site No Further Action Opinion Letter – no further remedial action is necessary to clean-up contamination at the site

What is the cost for HOTAP?

The fee for the Heating Oil Technical Assistance Program is $350.00. This fee covers the cost incurred in providing advice and assistance, expenses, review of reports and analysis, and preparation of written opinions and conclusions. The fee must be paid in full prior to PLIA issuing its report of review and assessment of data.

As a homeowner, I’ve discovered my tank has leaked but I’m not registered with PLIA.  I can now register in the HOTAP program to receive a review of the testing results and a letter from PLIA “closing the site”?  This is at a cost of $350?  All other out-of-pocket expenses; sampling, remediation, etc. come out of my pocket?

Yes, to all three questions.

My leaking tank is not registered with PLIA and I opt NOT to join HOTAP, as long as I’ve registered with Ecology I’m fine, correct?

No, the site still needs to be addressed and remediation is required. If a homeowner would like a letter stating the site has been closed through PLIA, they would need to enter into the HOTAP program.

I’m selling my home and the buyer has performed a tank search, and a tank has been found. Can I now register the abandoned tank with PLIA?

No, abandoned tanks CANNOT be registered with PLIA  in Washington State. Only active tanks are eligible for the program.

Septic Tank Decommissioning

Septic Tank Decommissioning Common Questions

What is a septic tank?

A septic tank processes wastewater from the home and consists of two main parts, the tank and a drain field.  It encompasses a piping connection, allowing the waste to flow from the home, through the tank and into the drain field, these connections are made through a T pipe, allowing liquid to enter and exit without disturbing the surface above.  The septic tank treats the wastewater and allows the separation of solids and liquids, once broken down the solids remain in the tank while the liquids drain into the leach field.

Septic tanks may be concrete or metal, 5 to 7 feet long and 5 to 7 feet deep, and will be located 5 to 30 feet away from the home.

Are there dangers associated with abandoned septic tanks?

Septic tanks that are buried underground are susceptible to corrosion, thus weakening the stability of the structure. The instability can cause the system to collapse, causing serious injury or death. Septic tanks contain dangerous gases due to the breakdown of decomposing matter, falling into a tank can cause the possibility of being overcome by noxious gases.

How do I know if I have a cesspool or septic tank on my property?

Within the Portland Metro area, there are two methods that may help determine if you have a cesspool or septic tank on your property:

  • For a general rule:
    • If your home is east of the Willamette River, most systems installed were cesspools.
    • If your home is west of the Willamette River, most systems installed were septic tanks.

How do you find a septic tank?

The location of the system would need to be determined by sending out a technician to the property.  The technician locates the main plumbing stack that comes through the roof and visually extends a straight line from the exterior foundation line.  From the foundation, the technician would follow the visual straight line out to the septic tank, between 5 to 30 feet from the home.

Decommissioning of a septic tank

How do you decommission a septic tank?

The proper septic tank decommissioning permit will need to be obtained for the city and/or the county the septic system is located in.

EcoTech uses excavation equipment to dig to the top of the structure to expose and open the septic system.  Once accessed and per OSHA regulation, shoring of the area around the system is completed to prevent collapse of the shaft and to ensure the safety of our technicians.

Our technicians will then inspect the interior of the tank, and pump any liquid or sludge that may be present.

Contingent on the city and/or county permitting process, inspection of the system may need to take place prior to filling the tank.  Inspection may also need to take place after the tank has been filled, depending on permit requirements.

When the tank has been pumped of all sludge, and all relevant inspections completed, the tank can be filled with either sand or gravel.  Once the septic tank is decommissioned, the technicians would replace the soil overburden, bringing the area back to surface grade, along with a closed permit for the decommissioned septic tank.

Septic Tank Decommissioning

Septic Tank Decommissioning – Dug down and exposed septic tank

Septic Tank Decommissioning

Septic Tank Decommissioning – Roped off septic pit for safety

Septic Tank Decommissioning

Septic Tank Decommissioning – Broken terracotta pipe, this is part of the system that allows wastewater to drain from the home. When the pipe is broken, this allows waste to seep into the yard.

Septic Tank Decommissioning

Septic Tank Decommissioning – Filled septic tank, with T piping junction of metal pipe to terracotta pipe.

Septic Tank Decommissioning

Septic Tank Decommissioning – Filled septic tank, with T piping junction of metal pipe to terracotta pipe.

Septic Tank Decommissioning

Septic Tank Decommissioning – Filled septic tank, ready for overburden to be replaced

For more information on local cities requirements on septic tank decommissioning within the Portland Metro area, please click on the following links:

Radon Measurement

Radon Measurement Common Questions

 

How do I find out if I have Radon in my home?

The only way to determine radon levels in your home is to conduct a radon measurement test.

Can I conduct my own test?

Yes, there are two different tests that you can conduct yourself.

  • Short-Term Radon Test. A short-term test kit is the quickest way to conduct a test. These kits can stay in your home from two to 90 days, depending on the device type. Short-term testing requires your home to be under “closed-house conditions”, meaning all doors and windows must be closed during testing, other than normal comings and goings from the home.  However, a short-term test is less likely than a long-term test to tell you what your year-long average radon level is, as radon levels tend to vary from day to day and season to season.
  • Long-Term Radon Test. A long-term test kit remains in your home for a minimum of 91 days, although testing can continue for a year. Long-term testing provides a more accurate reading of the radon levels within your home, especially if the home is tested up to a year. Results from a long-term test are more likely to reflect the variances in the radon level, as levels fluctuate from day to day, season to season, as well as the average “open-house conditions” that consists of the normal comings and goings from the home.
Radon Measurement

Radon Measurement – Different radon measurement devices.

Where can I buy a short-term or long-term test?

EcoTech sells both the short-term and long-term tests kits, please visit our EcoTech Store for purchasing information. Radon test kits can also be purchased at most hardware stores and cost an average of $15-$35.

What if I’m in a real estate transaction?

If you are purchasing a home, most buyers and their agents, test the new home as part of the inspection period. A Certified Radon Measurement Professional should be hired to conduct the radon test. The third party tester will perform a two day test, the test will be placed in the lowest portion of the home (i.e. crawlspace or basement) and will be required to be under “closed-house conditions”.

Radon Measurement

Radon Measurement – Technician setting a Continuous Radon Monitor (CRM) to measure and report the hourly increments of the radon levels within the home.

Radon Measurement Results

What is measured to determine if there is radon within the home?

To determine the amount of radon within the air, it is measured in “picocuries per liter of air” or pCi/L.  The gas itself is not measured directly, it is actually the radioactivity the radon produces that is measured.

What do the radon test results mean?

  • If the measurement reading reflects a 4.0 or lower pCi/L, you and your agent will receive a detailed report and no mitigation will be needed. Although, the EPA does recommend that you test, using a short-term or long-term test, every two years.
Radon Measurement

Radon Measurement – This is a CRM report which shows 2.4 pCi/l, which is below the EPA Action Level

  • If the measurement reading reflects a 4.0 or higher pCi/L, you and your agent will receive a detailed report and a proposal for a radon mitigation system to lower the radon levels in the home.
Radon Measurement

Radon Measurement – Extremely high CRM test, the overall average is 24.9, which is above the Action Level

I’m in a real estate transaction and I’ve scheduled my sewer scope for the same time as the radon test, is that okay?

EcoTech highly recommends that you DO NOT schedule the sewer scope and radon measurement at the same time.  If the two inspections are scheduled together, a 12 hour delay should be placed on the measurement device after the scope is completed. The sewer scope can be considered a disruption to the “closed house conditions” that are required during the radon test. Open sewer pipes, during a scope, can allow radon gases into a home. Thus, if a sewer scope is performed during a radon test, the exposed sewer can cause a spike in the test, reflecting in a false reading.

Cesspool Decommissioning

Cesspool Decommissioning Common Questions

What is a cesspool?

In the most basic terms a cesspool, it is an underground container for the temporary storage of liquid waste and sewage. The system is made up of loose-fitting brick or stone, which allows the liquids to seep through the stones and into the soil, leaving the solids behind.

Cesspools are usually made from concrete, brick or cement block, are 3 to 4 feet in diameter, and located 10 to 12 feet away from the exterior foundation of the home. Homes without a basement have cesspools typically located about 3 to 5 feet below ground surface and homes with a basement, the top will commonly be 8 to 10 feet below the ground surface.

Why should I worry about a cesspool?

Older abandoned cesspools are cause for concern since the system can become unstable and collapse, causing a sinkhole within the yard. The vulnerability of the design can be severely impacted due to flooding, heavy rains and tree roots. Since cesspools are at a minimum 3’ below the ground surface, falling into a pit which may contain liquids and sludge, can cause serious injury or death.

If you suspect that a sinkhole is forming within your yard, the area should be roped off immediately to prevent anyone from falling into the opening and a qualified expert should be contacted for assistance.

How do you find a cesspool?

The location of the system would need to be determined by sending out a technician to the property.  The technician locates the main plumbing stack that comes through the roof and visually extends a straight line from the exterior foundation line.  From the foundation, the technician would follow the visual straight line out to the cesspool, usually 12′ from the home.  Following the original plumbing and building sewer line is the most reliable way to find the cesspool.

The cesspool will be marked out and an excavation investigation would take place to determine the depth and to determine the contents of the system.

Cesspool

Cesspool marked out for excavation

Decommissioning of a cesspool

How do you decommission a cesspool?

The proper cesspool decommissioning permit will need to be obtained for the city and/or the county the cesspool is located in.

EcoTech uses excavation equipment to dig to the top of the structure to expose and open the cesspool.  Once accessed and per OSHA regulation, shoring of the area around the system is completed to prevent collapse of the shaft and to ensure the safety of our technicians.

Our technicians will then inspect the interior of the cesspool, and pump any liquid or sludge that may be present.

Contingent on the city and/or county permitting process, inspection of the system may need to take place prior to filling the cesspool.  Inspection may also need to take place after the system has been filled, depending on permit requirements.

Once the cesspool has been pumped of all sludge, and all relevant inspections completed, the cesspool can be filled with either sand or gravel.  The cesspool decommissioning has taken place, the technicians would the replace the soil overburden, bringing the area back to surface grade, along with a closed permit for the decommissioned cesspool.

Cesspool Decommissioning

Cesspool Decommissioning – After excavation, shaft shored up for safety to begin decommissioning.

Cesspool Decommissioning

Cesspool Decommissioning – Cesspool has been inspected and the decommissioning can begin.

Cesspool Decommissioning

Cesspool Decommissioning – Completed decommissioned cesspool.

For more information on local cities requirements on cesspool decommissioning within the Portland Metro area, please click on the following links:

Please note: although most of these links will reference septic tanks, the decommissioning processes is relatively similar.

UST Tank Search for Buyers

UST Tank Search for Buyers – Common Questions

As a Buyer, searching for an underground storage tank has become integrated as part of the inspection period. These are some of the most common questions that we are asked regarding the tank inspection process and why it is important to protect yourself before you buy.

What is an underground storage tank (UST)?

Homes, apartments, farms and some businesses that are currently or were previously heated using diesel heating oil, used an underground storage tank (UST) to store the heating oil. The USTs were usually buried in the yard, and copper tubing or steel piping was installed to deliver the diesel from the tank to the furnace. In Oregon, an estimated 100,000 USTs were installed for home heating.

UST Tank Search for Buyers

UST Tank Search for Buyers – Rendition of an underground storage tank (UST) buried in a yard, with the supply lines running into the home.

Why should I worry about a UST?

Underground storage tanks are made of steel, which are selected for their strength, not for their corrosion resistance. Therefore steel USTs rust through, given enough time. Like a roof, steel storage tanks have a life of about 25 years, and like a roof it is cheaper to replace the tank or convert to another heat source before it leaks and the damage is done.

UST Tank Search for Buyers

UST Tank Search for Buyers – Removed tank with numerous holes, this allows the diesel fuel to leak into the surrounding soil.

Performing the UST tank search

How do you find an abandoned UST?

The best way to determine if there is an abandoned oil tank on the property, is to conduct a tank search.

How do you perform a tank search?

EcoTech first will perform a Tank Background Search, this entails a detailed examination of state and local databases, as applicable. Besides years of on-the-job experience, our technician conducts a visual inspection for product lines and fill or vent pipes, utilizes metal detectors and Terra, our specially trained Petroleum Detection K-9.

UST Tank Search for Buyers

UST Tank Search for Buyers – Terra finds a tank

UST Tank Search for Buyers

UST Tank Search for Buyers – The UST Terra found during the tank search, is now marked out for sampling.

What if there is an in-service tank already on the property, should I still do a tank search?

EcoTech highly recommends doing a tank search to rule out any additional tanks that may or may not be on the property. On average our tank searches cost $99.00, during the inspection period this is money well invested. Not only does a tank search give you peace of mind that there are no additional tanks on the property. It can also save you from years of worry or money spent if there is indeed an additional leaking tank on the property, which you now own and are responsible for cleaning up.

 

UST Tank Search for Sellers

UST Tank Search for Sellers – Common Questions

As a homeowner, you may be thinking about or are preparing to put your home up for sale. For some homeowners, you may want to perform a tank search to prepare yourself for any unforeseen surprises during the home inspection period. On the other hand, you may know that there is a tank on your property that was decommissioned and never registered with the DEQ or that there is an abandoned oil tank, but you don’t know where. These are some of the most common questions that we are asked regarding the tank inspection process and important information you should know before you sell.

What is an underground storage tank (UST)?

Homes, apartments, farms and some businesses that are currently or were previously heated using diesel heating oil, used an underground storage tank (UST) to store the heating oil. The USTs were usually buried in the yard, and copper tubing or steel piping was installed to deliver the diesel from the tank to the furnace. In Oregon, an estimated 100,000 USTs were installed for home heating.

UST Tank Search for Sellers

UST Tank Search for Sellers – Rendition of an underground storage tank (UST) buried in a yard, with the supply lines running into the home.

Why should I worry about an UST?

Underground storage tanks are made of steel, which are selected for their strength, not for their corrosion resistance. Therefore steel USTs rust through, given enough time. Like a roof, steel storage tanks have a life of about 25 years, and like a roof it is cheaper to replace the tank or convert to another heat source before it leaks and the damage is done.

UST Tank Search for Sellers

UST Tank Search for Sellers – Shot from interior of tank, many small holes in the UST, which will cause diesel fuel to leak into the surrounding soil.

Performing the UST tank search

How do you find an abandoned UST?

The best way to determine if there is an abandoned oil tank on the property, is to conduct a tank search. As the homeowner, you may also look for these tell-tale signs of an abandoned oil tank:

  • An Oil Fill Pipe, these are usually close to the ground and near where the furnace is located in your home.  The lid itself will usually indicate OIL in the center of the cap.
UST Tank Search for Sellers

UST Tank Search for Sellers – Fill pipes can appear in multiple places within a property, in a walkway, grass, driveway, and even under a deck are a few examples.

  • A Vent Pipe, this is usually attached to the home, about two to eight feet up the side of the house and it is 1.25 to 1.5 inches in diameter with a small vent cap on it.

 

UST Tank Search for Sellers

UST Tank Search for Sellers – 4 different types of vents and their locations.  Fill vents can come in different sizes, colors, and may be placed at varying sections of the home.

  • Product lines, may be found sticking out of the ground in the yard, in a crawlspace or basement floor.  Product lines may still be attached to a basement or crawlspace wall next to water or gas pipes.
UST Tank Search for Sellers

UST Tank Search for Sellers – Crimped product lines may appear as random pipes sticking out of a basement floor or out of the dirt near the home in the yard. A product line may also appear running up a wall in a basement or crawlspace, like the far right picture (the thin line on the right)

  • Patching, will be present on a basement floor, it appears as though a pipe has been removed and covered with concrete.  The patching may appear as a bad “patch job” with numerous bumps and grooves.
UST Tank Search for Sellers

UST Tank Search for Sellers – Patching on a basement floor.

How do you perform a tank search?

EcoTech first will perform a Tank Background Search, this entails a detailed examination of state and local databases, as applicable. Besides years of on-the-job experience, our technician conducts a visual inspection for product lines and fill or vent pipes, utilizes metal detectors and Terra, our specially trained Petroleum Detection K-9.

UST Tank Search for Sellers

UST Tank Search for Sellers – Terra finds a tank within a planter.

UST Tank Search for Sellers

UST Tank Search for Sellers – The tank that Terra found is marked out. The purple arrow indicates where the vent pipe has been removed from the siding. The red arrows indicate the length of the tank, marked with orange flags as well as the tip of the measuring tape.

 

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning Common Questions

 

What does it mean to decommission a UST?

The most generic term, is to take the tank out of service.  Underground Storage Tank or UST decommissioning is accomplished by ensuring the tank has been properly cleaned and removed or completely filled with an inert material. The inert material consists either of perlite, a sand-like material or slurry, concrete.

If the tank is to be registered with DEQ, two soil samples will be taken from inside the bottom of the tank, after being pumped and cleaned, and analyzed for diesel and heavy oil. Each sample needs to be analyzed at an independent laboratory that is DEQ certified.

If the samples come back as non-detected, the tank can be then registered with the DEQ.

If the samples come back above the DEQ reporting limit (50.1 PPM), remediation will need to take place and once the corrective action has been completed, the tank will be registered with DEQ.  If soil remediation is need, please see our Decommissioning via Heating Oil Contaminated Soil Clean-Up page.

Why should homeowners decommission their UST and register it with the DEQ

I’ve emptied my tank of oil years ago and don’t use it any more, doesn’t that mean it is decommissioned?

No, in order to decommission the tank you will need to take the tank permanently out of service. This is completed by either removing the tank or filling it in place with an inert material.

Can I decommission my own UST?

According to the DEQ, it is legal for a homeowner to decommission their own UST, assuming that you perform the work yourself and comply with all applicable local, state and federal rules. Before deciding to decommission your own tank, the DEQ highly recommends that you read the DEQ Cleanup Guidance for Homeowners to understand the full scope of work involved in completing a decommissioning project. DEQ Decommissioning Guide for Homeowners

I’m selling my home and have switched over to gas years ago, should I decommission my tank?

It is not a requirement to decommission your tank before selling your home. Unfortunately in this highly active real estate market, many buyers will require at a minimum, proof of recent clean soil samples. Additionally, you will need to provide the buyer with documentation that the tank has been pumped of all of its contents. DEQ Out of Service Tank Requirements

Do I have to decommission my UST?

No, it is not a requirement to decommission your tank once you stop using it.  However, if you are thinking about selling your home, most buyers and their agents request decommissioning and registration before closing. Per DEQ, you will need to ensure that the tank has been emptied of oil and you will need to provide that documentation to the new buyer.  DEQ Requirements for Tanks No Longer in Use

Do I have to register my UST?

It is not required by DEQ to register the tank, but it is highly recommended. However, if you are decommissioning the tank as part of the sale of the home, this is usually a prerequisite prior to closing.

Why should I register my UST?

There are three primary benefits of registering the UST decommissioning with the DEQ:

  1. The decommissioning becomes public record.  So, even if your copy of the paperwork is misplaced or the name of the contractor that performed the work is forgotten, the record remains in the DEQ files.
  2. When the DEQ changes any of their rules (i.e. reporting limits, remediation guidelines, etc.), previously closed or registered tanks are “grandfathered” in.  Tanks that were decommissioned and not registered are subject to the new rules.  For example, over time the DEQ required the locations of soil sampling to change.  Meaning a previously unregistered decommissioned tank, would need to obtain additional soil samples to bring the tank up to the new DEQ sampling requirements.
  3. Most buyers are requiring DEQ registration because they don’t want to deal with future DEQ rule changes.  Even if you don’t plan to sell the property any time soon, registering the tank now can prevent added costs prior to and during a future sale.

I have a tank that was decommissioned years ago, but never registered with the DEQ, how do I now get it registered?

In order to establish if the tank has been decommissioned properly, soil samples and a tank inspection would be required. Soil samples need to be taken in order to determine if the tank had leaked prior to decommissioning. A tank inspection is necessary to establish if the tank has been decommissioned properly.

If the soil samples are clean and the tank has been decommissioned properly, the tank then can be registered with the DEQ.

USTs that have been Decommissioned inproperly

What happens if it isn’t decommissioned properly?

There could be a couple of different reasons a tank has not been decommissioned properly.  There may be inadequate or contaminated fill material, water within the tank or simply something that shouldn’t be in the tank (i.e. paint cans, large rocks, etc.).  Besides what is inside the tank, the soil samples will need to be taken into consideration to allow the tank to be certified as decommissioned to register with the DEQ.

  • Fill Material:  If the fill material within the tank is not an approved by the DEQ, that material will need to be removed and the tank will be re-decommissioned to DEQ standards for certification.  The same reasoning will go with contaminated fill material, even if it is DEQ approved material.  The contaminated material will need to be removed and the tank will need to be re-decommissioned to DEQ standards for certification.
  • Water:  If there is water within the tank, all water will be pumped out of the tank and re-decommissioned in order to certify with the DEQ.
  • Unconventional Items:  From time to time, items are found within a tank that should NOT be there.  Items such as large boulders, paint cans, trash cans and even tires have been discovered within a tank.  If this situation does arise, all items will need to be removed and disposed of in a landfill and the tank will need to be decommissioned.
Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning – Concrete, pain cans and water found within a tank.

What exactly do you do to decommission a tank?

In order to decommission an underground storage tank, we need to follow some step-by-step processes to ensure that we are able to take soil samples and inspect the tank properly.  This is the process by which EcoTech begins each in-place underground storage tank decommissioning project:

1.  We dig down, expose the tank and cut it open.

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning – Exposed tank top.

2.  All tank contents are removed; heating oil, residual liquids, sludge.

3.  Clean and dry the tank interior and inspect it for holes.

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning – Holes from within a tank.

4.  Collect soil samples from the inside and through the bottom of the tank.

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning – The technicians cut two holes in the bottom of the tank to expose the soil underneath, two samples are then “grabbed” underneath the tank bottom.

5.  Soil Samples are submitted to the lab the same day for analysis, with results typically back the next business day by noon.

6.  Pending favorable laboratory results (less than 50 PPM), the tank can be backfilled with perlite or slurry.

***If soil sample results come in above the 50 PPM, remediation would be required to bring the site up to DEQ requirements.  (Please see our Heating Oil Contaminated Soil Clean-Up section for additional information on remediation Clean-Up with Decommissioning).

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning

Underground Storage Tank or UST Decommissioning – Tank filled with slurry.

7.  After the tank has been filled, the tank is then covered back over with the previous landscape (i.e. grass, concrete, dirt, etc.).